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Focus Area Evaluations

Released in 2014

San Francisco ExCEL Evaluation Findings Report 2012-13 

San Francisco ExCEL is the after school programs office of the San Francisco Unified School District. San Francisco ExCEL sites provide comprehensive after school programs, which consist of a mandated mix of academic, recreational/physical, and enrichment components that are open to all students at the school site for low or no cost. DCYF provides matching funds for ExCEL programs located at SFUSD elementary and middle schools. The San Francisco ExCEL evaluation is managed by SFUSD and conducted by the evaluation firm Public Profit. This evaluation report combines multiple data sources to explore the extent to which sites are meeting program performance goals, providing high quality services for children and youth, and demonstrating benefits for participants.

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VPI and YWD-JSI Referral Process Analysis 

San Francisco City and County has made substantial investments in programs to prevent violence among youth and young adults and to connect youth to work opportunities. These investments include the Violence Prevention and Intervention (VPI) initiative and Youth Workforce Development services for Justice System Involved youth (YWD-JSI), previously known as YWD-HR (high risk). In 2011-12, 63 percent of juvenile justice-involved youth participated in VPI or YWD-JSI programs. This report combines a detailed analysis of linked data from the Juvenile Justice Information System (JJIS) and DCYF Contract Management System (CMS) with qualitative findings from interviews, focus groups, and written reports by DCYF program officers, and explores the following questions: How many youth are involved in different stages of the juvenile justice system in San Francisco? How do VPI and YWD-JSI programs interact with the juvenile justice system at each stage? Where in the process do system-involved youth connect with VPI and YWD-JSI? If system-involved youth are not reaching these services, where do they drop off? What, if any, are the barriers to JPD and VPI/YWD-JSI functioning as a coordinated system of care?

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SFUSD Student Characteristics of Violence Prevention and Intervention (VPI) Initiative and Youth Workforce Development Services for High Risk Youth (YWD-HR) Participants - Final Report

SFUSD Student Characteristics of Violence Prevention and Intervention (VPI) Initiative and Youth Workforce Development Services for High Risk Youth (YWD-HR) Participants - Brief

San Francisco’s Violence Prevention and Intervention Initiative (VPI) funds a network of services for youth, with the goal of preventing or reducing crime, violence and delinquency and building pro-social and resiliency skills. These services are jointly funded by the DCYF, the Juvenile Probation Department (JPD) and the Department of Public Health (DPH) and administered by DCYF. To gain a deeper understanding of the at-risk youth served by VPI and YWD-HR, this report presents a review of data from the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) on students who were at least 13 years old during the period of the VPI and YWD-HR interventions. This report and accompanying brief address questions relating to the student characteristics of VPI/YWD-HR youth, student characteristics by VPI/YWD-HR strategy, and the school risk factors among eighth grade youth.

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Released in 2013 

Violence Prevention and Intervention and Youth Workforce Development- High Risk Issue Brief

This brief examines the degree to which Violence Prevention and Intervention (VPI) and Youth Workforce Development- High Risk (YWD-HR) programs are reaching San Francisco youth who have had contact with the San Francisco Juvenile Probation Department (JPD). It also reviews early evidence regarding the influence of VPI/YWD-HR participation on the likelihood of subsequent arrests for these youth.

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Violence Prevention and Intervention and Youth Workforce Development- High Risk Evaluation Report

San Francisco City and County invests substantial resources in programs to prevent violence among at-risk youth and to connect youth to work opportunities. These investments include the Violence Prevention and Intervention (VPI) initiative and Youth Workforce Development services for High Risk Youth (YWD-HR). VPI represents an alignment of funding from three agencies – the Department of Children, Youth and their Families (DCYF), the Department of Public Health (DPH) and the Juvenile Probation Department (JPD) – to support violence prevention services. This evaluation report examines the characteristics of youth served by VPI and YWD-HR services, focusing primarily on fiscal year 2011-12. In particular, the report assesses the degree to which these programs reach youth who come into contact with the juvenile justice system. Following youth who have their first citation or booking at JPD, the evaluation team examined whether VPI/YWD-HR participation is associated with less likelihood of a repeat offense. For all YWD-HR youth, the evaluation team also examined the likelihood of job placement.

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Out of School Time Programs Evaluation 2011-2012

DCYF funds 195 Out of School Time (OST) programs throughout San Francisco for children in Kindergarten through 8th grade. This report highlights findings from an analysis of participation, performance and program quality for three OST strategies: Community-based Afterschool, School-based Non-ExCEL and K-8 Specialized, which encompassed 87 programs in FY 2011-12. The report includes analyses of youth served, dosage patterns (the amount of time a participant spends in a program), program performance, and program quality to answer the following questions: What are the characteristics of youth served by these OST programs? How well do programs meet existing performance measures? What factors are associated with meeting these measures? And what is the range of quality among the programs as measured by youth surveys and Program Observation Visits (POVs)? 

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Summer 2012 Program Evaluation, K-8 Summer & School Break Programs

The Summer 2012 Program Evaluation report highlights findings from an analysis of participation, performance and program quality for the 64 programs funded under the K-8 Summer and School Break strategy that operated primarily in summer 2012. Findings are organized according to the following questions: What are the characteristics of the youth served by this strategy and how does that compare to San Francisco youth as a whole? How often do youth attend programs, and how does that compare to expectations in DCYF's Request for Proposals (RFP)? And how well do programs meet existing performance measures?

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Released in 2012 

OST Evaluation Handout from 2012 All Grantee Meeting 

Youth Workforce Development Evaluation Handout from 2012 All Grantee Meeting 

Youth Workforce Development Evaluation Presentation from 2012 All Grantee Meeting 

Teen Evaluation Handout from 2012 All Grantee Meeting

Teen Evaluation Presentation from 2012 All Grantee Meeting 

DCYF Programs for Newcomer and English Learner Youth

Violence Prevention and Intervention Evaluation Handout from 2012 All Grantee Meeting-Handout #1 

Violence Prevention and Intervention Evaluation Handout from 2012 All Grantee Meeting-Handout #2

Family Resource Center Initiative: Evaluation Year 2 Executive Summary 
Family Resource Center Initiative: Evaluation Year 2 Presentation 
Family Resource Center Initiative: Evaluation Year 2 Report

DCYF, First 5 San Francisco, and the San Francisco Human Services Agency contracted with Mission Analytics Group to conduct a multi-year evaluation of their jointly funded Family Resource Center (FRC) Initiative, which began on July 1, 2009 with funding for 24 FRC grants at 22 agencies. We are pleased to release the Year 2 Evaluation Report highlighting patterns of service use at funded centers and participant outcomes in key goal areas. Among the many noteworthy findings, we learned that in just one week during the 2010-11 fiscal year, FRCs offered a total of 36 different community events, 20 parent education classes, 35 parent support groups, 393 individual case management sessions, and distributed 246 bags of food at 4 food pantries. Throughout the entire year, nearly 10,000 parents/caregivers and over 3,000 children/youth were served in these and a variety of other activities.

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For more information about DCYF's evaluation process, please contact Sarah Duffy.

Last updated: 4/7/2016 6:33:49 PM
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